A message from the heart: move more, sit less

by Gabrielle Taylor September 29, 2016

A message from the heart: move more, sit less

Today is World Heart Day, and the Heart Foundation Australia is urging you to know the facts about Cardiovascular Disease (CVD).

CVD is a leading cause of death in Australia, with 1 in 3 people dying each year from various diseases and conditions involving the heart and blood vessels.

The main types of Cardiovascular Disease are coronary heart disease, stroke and heart failure/cardiomyopathy.

Heart Foundation Australia want you to know how to get heart healthy and why you should make it a priority in your day-to-day life.

According to the World Heart Federation, it only takes a few small changes to switch direction and begin on a path toward a healthy heart: “Just a few simple steps such as eating more healthily, cutting down on alcohol and stopping smoking can improve your heart health and your overall well-being.”

So get behind this great cause and start sharing your Healthy Heart Selfies in support of #WorldHeartDay.

Find out more about World Heart Day, and some helpful facts about Cardiovascular Disease here.

Gabrielle Taylor
Gabrielle Taylor

Author



Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.


Also in Our Blog

Could this be the Gold standard in wearables?
Could this be the Gold standard in wearables?

by Gabrielle Taylor August 23, 2017

With an aim to reduce the bulky health sensors that are currently used by practitioners, scientists have created a super-thin wearable that has the ability to record data through skin.

Continue Reading

Early-stage heart disease diagnosis via handheld scanner
Early-stage heart disease diagnosis via handheld scanner

by Gabrielle Taylor August 17, 2017

Continue Reading

Heart disease myths debunked
Heart disease myths debunked

by Gabrielle Taylor August 10, 2017

Know the facts: Heart problems are no longer an issue exclusively associated with old age, but increasingly young and middle-aged individuals - especially with current numbers of obesity, type II diabetes, hypertension and other risk factors becoming more prevalent at a younger age than ever before.

Continue Reading