Bad news for Avocado lovers

by Gabrielle Taylor March 10, 2017

Bad news for Avocado lovers

Are you a millennial who loves your avo toast? STOP reading now!

A recent study suggests you might just be at risk of health problems if you happen to overindulge in the not-so-good stuff.

Wait a second! Haven’t we been taught for however many years that the green stuff is in fact good for us? A good fat, even? 

Well, it turns out that you can’t trust everything you’re told.

New research conducted by Cambridge University suggests that the 'healthy fats' contained in avocados and other foods including nuts and fish, can increase the risk of heart disease.

In a recent interview with BBC News, Professor Adam Butterworth from Cambridge University said:

"This is one of the first studies to show that some people that have high levels of 'good' cholesterol actually have a higher risk of heart disease so it challenges our conventional wisdom about whether 'good' cholesterol is protecting people from heart disease or not."

The numbers were quite low, but any correlation is a scary correlation and one that many millennials will not be alone in fearing.

To read more about the study (if you can in fact handle the truth) click here.

Gabrielle Taylor
Gabrielle Taylor

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