Snoring: Bad for sleep, bad for health

by Gabrielle Taylor February 16, 2017

Snoring: Bad for sleep, bad for health

Snoring is often an annoying factor when it comes to sleeping with a partner, but what if snoring was responsible for more than the odd slap on the back in the middle of the night?

We have compiled some key points from an article found on the SBS, which outlined why snoring could be deteriorating your cardiovascular health, among other things:

  1. Snoring can be a marker for obstructive sleep apnoea, a disorder where the upper airway repeatedly closes during sleep, and breathing stops for at least ten seconds at a time.

  2. Sleep apnoea ultimately starves the body of oxygen and fragments sleep.

  3. Obstructive sleep apnoea sufferers are often excessively sleepy and at greater risk of car and industrial accidents, cardiovascular disease and reduced brain function.

  4. A reduction in brain function has been linked to a poor memory and reduced ability to learn. In children, snoring is associated with behavioural issues and poorer academic performance.

  5. Studies in recent times have found that snoring may actually be a direct cause of cardiovascular complications, in particular a condition known as carotid artery atherosclerosis.

  6. One study has shown that snoring vibrations are transmitted to the carotid artery, which can damage its wall and lead to the development of atherosclerosis.

According to the article published by the SBS, subsequent vibrations may rupture a formed plaque, resulting in pieces of the plaque moving through the bloodstream and blocking small vessels in the brain. However, additional research is required to bring further clarity to this hypothesis.

For more details on snoring, including why we snore, click here.

Gabrielle Taylor
Gabrielle Taylor

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